Preparing a more self-aware student with adult self-exploration

Preparing a more self-aware student with adult self-exploration

Preparing a more self-aware student with adult self-exploration

Learning how to teach math can be different for everyone. And that’s a good thing

Question: When I edit a review of a math I/th grade level class to 10th grade level, I’m busy changing gradients and tacking up algebra numbers. How should I think about introducing calculus to a student who is stuck in this thinking pattern?

Answer: Self-improvement is a form of self-consciousness. Revising math homework is a part of that self-improvement—and I recommend this strategy to many of my teachers.

Learning how to teach math can be different for everyone. All educators are successful at different levels of math teaching. As our society grows, getting more children ready for college, careers, and daily life is becoming a national goal. A learning style that helps a student reach that goal is important to all of us.

This goes far beyond reviewing the math in the grade level. For example, at my own school, I don’t coach students on interpretation questions. Instead, we brainstorm to develop new theories, explore new and complicated concepts, and increase problem-solving skills by remembering key concepts. What we need to do is look at this homework as an opportunity to do this.

Changing an adult’s thinking patterns doesn’t always mean changing a student’s learning style, but it’s a first step. And in this instance, it can also work to turn students into learners, not processors.

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