Gallaudet-D.C.A.E.D. Reading of Report Finds That District of Columbia Public Schools have Some Major Challenges

Gallaudet-D.C.A.E.D. Reading of Report Finds That District of Columbia Public Schools have Some Major Challenges

Gallaudet-D.C.A.E.D. Reading of Report Finds That District of Columbia Public Schools have Some Major Challenges

In a matter of months, the newly-expanded school district instituted new policies and strategies for expanding their students’ own learning, and it is in this the local public school district found itself. After reviewing its curriculum and interviewing students and teachers, Gallaudet University’s Center for Training Programs and Enterprise Development produced an evaluation of the Washington, D.C. Public Schools public school system, presenting results that address potential student learning gaps and how to reduce them.

The report finds that more students are missing classroom instruction, sub-par instruction and declining test scores since the passage of the D.C. Every Student Succeeds Act in 2015, the federal law that replaced the 2002 No Child Left Behind Act, stating in part that the law’s insistence on school “growth” measures over meeting standards had not been replaced by comparable measures. This led to an evaluation of their curriculum and instructional methods.

Gallaudet’s staff were invited to the D.C. system to compare student performance data with their own survey and surveys of students and teachers. Gallaudet then used their program and materials as the foundation for integrating ACT, Advanced Placement, and College Board rankings into the district’s catalog of graduation requirements and year-end assessments. This change had potential implications for districts nationwide with large student populations of low-income students.

Of all the districts reviewed, District 9 (which includes all of Virginia’s public schools in Montgomery, Prince George’s, Frederick, Washington, St. Mary’s, and Charles counties) is the worst performer on the ACT credit count. For students graduating from high school in Virginia, the average ACT score was 26. The District 9 average was 34, a 12 point difference.

In other findings:

Only 49 percent of District 9 students met the ACT requirement.

Only one-fifth of District 9 students have met the ACT threshold.

Only 28 percent of District 9 students who earned a “best possible” ACT grade of 10 scored a 3 or higher on the College Board’s final exam.

More than half of Washington, D.C. Public Schools middle and high school students use at least one Gallaudet program.

“This is not a partisan report or a partisan report about a local school district,” said Michelle Pappas, the director of the Center for Training Programs and Enterprise Development and co-author of the report. “The reality is the Washington, D.C. Public Schools, like many schools and districts across the nation, are struggling to stay in line with the challenges of the 21st century economy.”

For more information on its findings, including results of its interviews with students and teachers, read the report from the Center for Training Programs and Enterprise Development at http://www.centerfortrainin….

The Washington, D.C. Public Schools is a leader in preparing learners to succeed in a global, digital world.

With nearly 100,000 students, D.C. Public Schools operates four traditional public high schools, four specialized programs, and 65 community schools. D.C. Public Schools serves students in the District of Columbia, the Washington Metropolitan area, Northern Virginia, Montgomery County, Frederick County, Charles County, and Worcester County, Connecticut.

Washington, D.C. Public Schools #ProjectViva

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *