Use Cognitive Strategies to Help Students Read More Commercially Effective Literature

Use Cognitive Strategies to Help Students Read More Commercially Effective Literature

Use Cognitive Strategies to Help Students Read More Commercially Effective Literature

“This is certainly another example of what we’ve learned over the years. Educators need to be showing their kids how they might, at their level, use these strategies.”

To help students increase the accuracy and comprehension of their reading comprehension, read with your child

Research suggests that many teachers can go a long way toward helping their students develop the skills necessary to read a paragraph with more confidence, meaning they can feel more confident when they return to the topic in the future.

Tobias Schwabe, a professor of reading education at Lake Superior State University (LSSU), works to address these student needs by teaching students and teachers how to use cognitive strategies—beneficial tools like mental research, analyzing new texts, articulating ideas, contextualizing information, and balancing logical sequencing.

Schwabe and his team created a Creative Reading website to provide the tools needed to help students in all grades adopt these strategies and to increase their ability to read comprehension.

“These new strategies are primarily aimed at older readers,” Schwabe says. “But we do know that these strategies can be beneficial to younger readers. The authors of the Pearson Essential Reading Test emphasized the need for effective reading instruction to help raise young readers’ levels of effectiveness.”

The Pearson Essential Reading Test, Schwabe says, “is a measure of how students use these emerging skills. It indicates how well students can explain, describe, and support information they read; it also provides a measure of how students are reading from large, complex text and how well they are understanding the information contained in it.”

The LSSU website includes Cognitive Strategies to Help Student Reading in Various Grades, a novel by David Young entitled Last Summer; a video series, Test Tap, that explains cognitive strategies for student learning; and other materials, which allow students and teachers to understand the strategies needed to read with confidence.

“These techniques do very well,” Schwabe says. “This is certainly another example of what we’ve learned over the years. Educators need to be showing their kids how they might, at their level, use these strategies.”

The Cognitive Strategies help students both read in general and write. And, Schwabe says, students generally do better when taught these techniques. “Whether they learn them at school or through practice, there are always benefits to students.”

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