Why Parenting Adults Is Different From When Children Are Young

Why Parenting Adults Is Different From When Children Are Young

Why Parenting Adults Is Different From When Children Are Young

Recipetips.com

Weaning or “lean in” parenting involves supporting and guiding our children, especially those who want to be independent learners.

Parenting young people who are connected to tech can mean more than just wiping down phones at night. It’s about helping them learn, flourish, and break down the wide-ranging social norms that might be interfering with their development.

One of the most compelling arguments is that today’s high school students may spend more time on their phones than in school.

And it’s not just teens. Parents of tweens are also noticing kids are spending more time watching and chatting on the internet than they are doing in their actual physical classrooms. In fact, they spend more time on screens than with siblings or friends.

So, how should we navigate this new frontier of parenting?

Here’s what we think.

The Good: Lifting the Digital Divide

For every generation, the world has grown cleaner and richer. But not everyone was on the same train.

Yes, for every generation, the world has grown cleaner and richer. But not everyone was on the same train. Younger generations might remember a cleaner, rich world where they were allowed to invent and innovate at their own pace. That sort of school for adults has gone away. Today’s kids have grown up in an age of social connection, unlimited ability to communicate in a global space and constant connectivity.

For every generation, the world has grown cleaner and richer. But not everyone was on the same train. Yes, for every generation, the world has grown cleaner and richer. But not everyone was on the same train. Younger generations might remember a cleaner, rich world where they were allowed to invent and innovate at their own pace. That sort of school for adults has gone away. Today’s kids have grown up in an age of social connection, unlimited ability to communicate in a global space and constant connectivity.

The Bad: Kids Will Disconnect Under the Radar

For the most part, parents understand the need to provide guidance. Sometimes it’s as easy as swapping one book for another; many parents in my culture really care about “screen time limits” but tend to leave it up to their kids to figure out for themselves. Not so here in America. In many parts of the country, parents are not necessarily aware of the social norms around online behavior and the effects that behavior can have on kids. Other parents in this country can’t help but subscribe to social norms about how to parent. As a result, many parents will “disconnect” under the radar without any intention of helping their children.

For the most part, parents understand the need to provide guidance. Sometimes it’s as easy as swapping one book for another; many parents in my culture really care about “screen time limits” but tend to leave it up to their kids to figure out for themselves. Not so here in America. In many parts of the country, parents are not necessarily aware of the social norms around online behavior and the effects that behavior can have on kids. Other parents in this country can’t help but subscribe to social norms about how to parent. As a result, many parents will “disconnect” under the radar without any intention of helping their children.

The Ugly: Dead-Endories and Confusion

Parents also tend to fall victim to the old fail-fail cycle of teaching versus forbidding. This kind of posture has made it hard for parents to get in the middle, find the right space for balance, and help set their kids up for success.

Parents also tend to fall victim to the old fail-fail cycle of teaching versus forbidding. This kind of posture has made it hard for parents to get in the middle, find the right space for balance, and help set their kids up for success.

The Culprit: Confusion, Authority, Blame

We already know that kids need permission and encouragement to engage in certain activities — like eating ice cream — and that they can do without nagging. We also know that they need permission and encouragement to keep doing things they are not proud of — like faking homework. But this isn’t the same as saying that sometimes parents want to make fun of their kids when they do things they are ashamed of. No. If parents are actually honest, it’s because they care — much like everyone else — about their kids being happy and well-adjusted.

Because a healthy level of self-consciousness is actually a sign of maturity and self-assurance.

Meanwhile, parents always seem to be quick to assign blame when their kids don’t accomplish things. Families become divided around which “power lies” with parents and children.

When we get stuck in these tangents, we lose sight of our larger goals.

If we want our kids to lean in, then we

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *