Chasing Kids! Learn to Safety-Resistant Your Classroom

Chasing Kids! Learn to Safety-Resistant Your Classroom

Chasing Kids! Learn to Safety-Resistant Your Classroom

Chasing Kids! Learn to Safety-Resistant Your Classroom

Deborah Farmer Kris is a Cooperative Education teacher at Milbury YMCA. She is the author of Survive the Blackout: Managing Temporarily Out of Control Kids. She can be found online @shellcalf.

The Aftermath of a Child Trauma-Related Episode: Use Teaching Methods to Protect Your Classroom

Kids come to school with an array of mental health and behavioral issues stemming from traumatic experiences. In many cases, their entire school is impacted, not just the four walls of a classroom. Kids will throw tantrums, have “lowered self-esteem,” perform poorly in tests, commit acts of inappropriate behavior, regress, and be disruptive in class. They may fail to progress through their class due to frustration and agitation, which can extend beyond their classes and into the entire school setting.

There are effective ways for all students to learn, and to have an engaging and healthy learning environment, but the impact of trauma at school can overwhelm the learning efforts of kids, and their teachers. In 2017, The CDC published a national study on children and school safety, analyzing some of the top causes of student dropout in the U.S. They found chronic poor health was cited as the primary reason for young students not graduating. They also reported chronic mental health symptoms were prevalent in over half of America’s high schoolers. No teenager wants to be the one to say, “This isn’t how you should be,” at an early age. As a result, there is a wide range of behaviors associated with trauma at school, and many are related to hearing constant gunfire, witnessing violence, or losing a loved one to violence.

Just what can be done to reduce the impact of trauma at school? Here are some tips for addressing trauma and traumatic events in the classroom.

Teachers need support as much as children. It is important for the teacher to be prepared to deal with an event such as a fight or another physical altercation. For instance, one teacher reported that her entire school has been hit by gunshots, as students are brought back to school from home. This has a lot of stress placed on teachers and resources are needed to help them cope. Teachers should be given safety plans for classrooms to work with in an active shooter event. Some schools have training and drills to practice emergency response and support the teachers so the student will not feel like a helpless bystander.

Teachers need support as much as children. It is important for the teacher to be prepared to deal with an event such as a fight or another physical altercation. For instance, one teacher reported that her entire school has been hit by gunshots, as students are brought back to school from home. This has a lot of stress placed on teachers and resources are needed to help them cope. Teachers should be given safety plans for classrooms to work with in an active shooter event. Some schools have training and drills to practice emergency response and support the teachers so the student will not feel like a helpless bystander. Make an active, safe environment. It is important for kids to feel safe. Many traumatic experiences can be lessened or reduced completely by making their surroundings active and safe. For instance, schools can make a physical barrier in their classrooms for children to retreat into with their backpacks. Children could also go to the office to open up a safe space in their classroom, after alerting the teacher. Some kids may not want to go into this safe area because they are too intimidated, but it would be a great way to reduce the impact of any events occurring at school.

It is important for kids to feel safe. Many traumatic experiences can be lessened or reduced completely by making their surroundings active and safe. For instance, schools can make a physical barrier in their classrooms for children to retreat into with their backpacks. Children could also go to the office to open up a safe space in their classroom, after alerting the teacher. Some kids may not want to go into this safe area because they are too intimidated, but it would be a great way to reduce the impact of any events occurring at school. Create an atmosphere that supports healing and safe expression. Children can help foster a safe learning environment for kids in their school and at home by encouraging them to do things they are comfortable with and talking about safety and kindness as they learn through their trauma. Teachers and other adults can use a strong communication style and show kids that they love them, even if they might want to keep them safe.

References:

https://www.cdc.gov/factshe…

https://www.frc-ny.org/publ…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *