4 Questions to Ask to Be the Definitive CRM Pitch Leader

4 Questions to Ask to Be the Definitive CRM Pitch Leader

4 Questions to Ask to Be the Definitive CRM Pitch Leader

by Katrina Schwartz, Manager of Digital Marketing at Your Source2

When it comes to helping build a relationship with a prospective client, the goal is simple: an effective dialogue that breaks the ice, creates trust and identifies the top priorities, issues and concerns for your customer.

Whether you’re representing a thought leader, researcher, artisan, startup, executive, publishing house or developer, there are four questions to ask that will quickly establish your credibility and build client trust:

Prioritize. What is the most important need of my client? What is the most important thing my client needs you to do for them?

What is the most important need of my client? What is the most important thing my client needs you to do for them? Make the following requests. What should I ask of my client and how should I ask? How will I implement? What if they can’t meet with me?

What should I ask of my client and how should I ask? How will I implement? What if they can’t meet with me? What happens if they can’t meet with me? What tools do I need to develop and how can I ensure I understand everything?

To prioritize and make requests, create an action plan and map out meetings. There’s nothing more intimidating than setting up a meeting with a speaker. The conversation begins on a level of trust you don’t have when you’re face-to-face. Before you set up your first meeting, prepare a note with a list of key objectives, expectations and logistics. If you have a photographer, make sure you know what your client will be taking photos of.

Afterward, you can determine where you meet and who can bring what equipment. Make sure you make the meeting as seamless as possible by following up right away. Most clients will have everything on their laptops and smart phones. Try communicating through a WhatsApp or Facebook Messenger group so the recipient can help answer questions or correct or confirm information.

Asking questions may be the most important engagement tool in your pitch and help your clients have as much confidence in you as possible, whether they know you by name or simply by reputation.

Lead through evidence. Build trust first with a confident call to action. Build trust, not just in your knowledge, expertise or platform, but also in your approach and leadership.

What is your inspiration for problem solving? What has led you to a goal? What resources or tools do you use? What questions did you need help with? What’s really going on inside a client’s mind?

Asking difficult and insightful questions is incredibly powerful. Study your competition to know the strengths and weaknesses of each company, and then ask your questions to cut through the noise.

Think of questions as a conversation starter and a prelude to closing. In the sales experience, sales people have been trained to focus on closing, which comes after the conversation, and therefore time is valuable. Listening to customers in the pitch is about letting them lead and telling them the good, the bad and the ugly.

In the absence of closing, communicating your values and commitment at the beginning of the conversation is a terrific way to start a conversation and provide credibility to your company and value to your client.

Reference yours. Both clients and prospects can use your bio and experience. You have valuable experiences and contacts that you can offer to leverage in order to make a sale or build a more successful partnership.

Always reflect back on what you said, especially when you fail to set boundaries. Say, “If we had two more minutes, we could explain this more.”

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