Children Who Suffer from Stress Don't Perform As Well on Standardized Tests

Children Who Suffer from Stress Don’t Perform As Well on Standardized Tests

Children Who Suffer from Stress Don't Perform As Well on Standardized Tests

A stressful day can be a good thing—it energizes you and makes you want to move and work harder. But if you feel continually stressed, your body may release hormones called neurotransmitters to help the brain remember.

There’s a variable correlation between how you deal with stress and how you perform in tests or on other levels in school. Back when we tested how kids with behaviors like crying would handle standardized tests, and what types of timeouts were given to those with problems in the classroom, it turned out that kids with a higher number of timeouts performed at a higher level in tests. It might be in our genes.

However, researchers are still trying to learn how kids with difficulties who seem to do well on other tests might not do as well in tests that measure intellectual acuity, memory, planning, organization, and organization. As Nobel Prize-winning behavioral scientist Daniel Kahneman (Read: Why Sometimes You Can’t Tell if You’re Smart or Not) and his colleagues began to investigate this link, they found that when parents intervened in their child’s test results (including the specific amount of timeouts and time the child was given) the child was able to perform better in standardized tests.

Obligatory fact of life: if you want kids to do well in school, you can’t be a jerk to them, but if you want to see a difference in their test scores, you also need to intervene.

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