Our Custom World, Our Neighborhood Libraries, and The Role We Play in Allowing Individuals To Successfully Transition

Our Custom World, Our Neighborhood Libraries, and The Role We Play in Allowing Individuals To Successfully Transition

Our Custom World, Our Neighborhood Libraries, and The Role We Play in Allowing Individuals To Successfully Transition

Intimate and immediate support of learners in their education can aid the decision making process to alleviate cognitive loading in disabilities, disorders, and physical disability. Students are encouraged to open up and fully discuss their mental health issues when the use of library resources can assist in creating a positive and healthy learning environment. As such, libraries are well-suited for their role in providing students with:

Confidentiality

A need to open up about their personal and academic lives without fear of reprisal.

Connection

Encouraging them to work through conflict from their colleagues and peers; similarly, libraries can play an active role in teaching them how to prevent conflicts and other detrimental behaviors.

Calmness

Connecting students with collaborative resources that help them calm down and do the work they need to do; thus, promoting creative thinking, problem solving, and other critical and productive activities.

Independent and Findable

Learning resources are available as they are learned, and researchers have identified that continuous learning and researching are essential to reduce mental health, learning, and literacy concerns among students with autism, dyslexia, ADHD, dyspraxia, and other disabilities.

References:

Stoner, W.J. (2006). Uncovering The Brain’s Puzzle. New York: McGraw Hill Books.

Largest Research Prize for Cognition and Learning: 2016. Retrieved on May 9, 2017, from http://www.chfp.org/researc…

Cron, K.J. & Ghiota, F. (2012). Does Using the Reading Lab Space Impact Performance of Adolescents with Dyslexia? J Childmath Eddispective. Retrieved on June 19, 2017, from http://eprints.columbia.edu….

Abbott, S. (2017). Irresistible force: An explanation of learning in the mind, brain, and culture. Sydney: Australian Scientific Publishers.

Transcript for Op-Ed: Introduction

Julienne Zingales’ Ph.D. interview (also published on the American Society for Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities website)

I’m definitely someone who is a workaholic, a perfectionist. I’m always playing, but I really like to work.

I really like to see the difference between one thing and the next thing. I like to get to the end and see how it’s improved.

I really like people. I can’t go a weekend without my family.

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