Gifted and Intelligent Children Don’t Need Weaker Resources

Gifted and Intelligent Children Don’t Need Weaker Resources

Gifted and Intelligent Children Don’t Need Weaker Resources

The ratings system advocates for showcasing the best and the brightest, including best college prep and life skills. The system is, however, a bit more diverse than it appears when you turn to see how many clubs and activities a student has been a part of. These lists almost never have the faces of gifted students, students who have extremely high skill level, who have made remarkable academic and life adjustments, students who are not really quite as gifted as they appear. Instead of helping people understand the extent to which gifted and intelligent children need intensive resources to excel, we provide maps for people to see only how much work you are giving gifted and intelligent children so that you don’t need more than you are able to afford.

The problem with the disproportionate depiction of the gifted as those without sufficient resources is that it creates ignorance and stigma among students with high potential. If this wasn’t enough, the fact that the industry that exists to document the philanthropic efforts of philanthropists, often neglects to identify the recipients of the resources. Rather than understanding the reasons why, we end up acting as if the resources are “flourishing” and advancing these children as confidently as if they were successful people. Many of these resources are fortunate enough to have matching gifts for all levels of gifted education (teachers, books, materials, art, music, etc.), but most don’t.

In fact, much of the evidence comes from high-intuitiveness and high-mobility school districts, and the younger and more fragile students are found there. This doesn’t happen to most students in middle schools and high schools. Often, students with more experienced teachers in the classroom have to learn about talents, abilities, and abilities that they may not even recognize yet. Often, kids with a greater level of academic and life experience are drawn to the classroom and are ready for greater resources. Perhaps we can use this opportunity to educate families and friends about gifted children who do not have these resources available to them, a greater understanding of gifted students that may indicate higher likelihood of success in school and in life.

The child who may fall in the gap between some of the brightest and most expensive education options may not receive the help and support that is necessary to succeed. Even though gifted children may have the potential to be intellectually brilliant, they have more complex needs than average students. These children are often predisposed to do well academically due to innate qualities, but their brains aren’t wired to absorb and process much different than that of a typical middle school student. So many children are in fact isolated from their own intelligence, so this is all a very welcome exploration. It may even be a refreshing critique of other schools for such a monumental unmet need.

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