Adding Critical Context to Classroom Discussions

Adding Critical Context to Classroom Discussions

Adding Critical Context to Classroom Discussions

All of us spend substantial time in the classroom, often doing little else in between classes or homework assignments, but some learning happens outside the classroom. Do you know what shapes your student’s learning? An impromptu question, answer, or lesson from his peers can help set the stage for better classroom discussions, improved reading comprehension, and stronger teachers. When students act in roles as observers, they reveal how they feel about a topic.

Alongside all-important tasks like writing, grammar, and vocabulary, one important task for learning is often ignored: student behavior. When students ask questions that are pertinent to the conversation, they get the chance to learn what others think and communicate their interpretations—all while building camaraderie and positive relationships with their classmates.

For the above reason, and to remove the intimidation factor that can thwart comprehension in classrooms, the importance of student participation in classroom discussions cannot be underestimated. For instance, when the topic of the day is reading comprehension, ask students to practice what they learned in English classes and tap into each other’s knowledge. The discussion then generates perspectives and forms a unique perspective.

What brings them together is one central focus: ask questions.

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