How to Help Teens Who Have Exhausted Their Qualities

How to Help Teens Who Have Exhausted Their Qualities

How to Help Teens Who Have Exhausted Their Qualities

For many students, those thoughts often begin with discomfort—conceptual discomfort or performance anxiety, to be exact. Finding this discomfort out can be a challenge for students who are often faced with high expectations and little room for error. Whether it’s an academic process or a person to meet, anxious thoughts can make finding your way to the place where you do the best work an overwhelming task.

While this pervasive idea of student anxiety is a huge obstacle for achieving success, it also presents a great opportunity for the way we teach and assess work. From the moment students enter school, it is our responsibility to help them discover the right mindset for performing work they are good at.

If you are looking to help improve student work habits or to help students find their best work, start by asking them questions to help identify their world view. If they have a clear understanding of what they want to accomplish and when, questions like “what are your best capabilities?” will start the flow of ideas in the right direction. As students move on to more complex tasks, it is important to help them build confidence and tools to find these capabilities.

Investment in questioning means constant dialogue from the start, and that never ends. While it can be overwhelming to hear questions over and over and expect some resolution, you can always walk away with a clearer picture of the way you want to work.

Education doesn’t stop at the time students graduate. Today’s students live in a world that they have to navigate year-round, even when they have the ability to give up.

Students need to realize that even if their school year is difficult, that is not a bad thing. While there is no excuse for poor schoolwork, students need to remind themselves that mastery takes time, and that when it is handed to them, that time has been earned through continuous engagement in self-improvement. As in life, experts believe that focus makes progress, so students need to be proactive, pursue work that feels most consistent and allows them to take ownership and ownership of their work.

If you are looking to improve student work habits or to help students find their best work, start by asking them questions to help identify their world view. If they have a clear understanding of what they want to accomplish and when, questions like “what are your best capabilities?” will start the flow of ideas in the right direction. As students move on to more complex tasks, it is important to help them build confidence and tools to find these capabilities.

Investment in questioning means constant dialogue from the start, and that never ends. While it can be overwhelming to hear questions over and over and expect some resolution, you can always walk away with a clearer picture of the way you want to work.

Education doesn’t stop at the time students graduate. Today’s students live in a world that they have to navigate year-round, even when they have the ability to give up. They are expected to respond within the space of hours to pressing situations, with questions about best practices that were never asked or for advice on their larger, year-long work obligations.

At the end of the day, much of education is a learning process, and so often our efforts stop at an end of the year project. Students need to recognize this fact and when the moment presents itself, explore instead of avoid questions. When students are up front about their challenges, we encourage them to support them in solving their problems, providing feedback and ideas that will help them discover and build their strengths. These developmental conversations need to happen throughout the school year in order to help them evaluate and focus on the best work they are doing.

Authorized in Washington State by Washington Governor Jay Inslee, The BE OPTIONED Global Institute is a partnership of four nonprofit organizations. The BE OPTIONED’s purpose is to create academic learning and career opportunities for youth in the Pacific Northwest who have been the victims of intergenerational trauma or educational neglect. The solutions that are being developed by the BE OPTIONED Global Institute are specifically designed to meet the needs of youth who have been subject to the severe trauma, often referred to as the BE OPTIONED Global Cluster.

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