Fighting the School Effectiveness IOU – How to improve school performance

3 Teachers Who Don’t Quit And Sure, Teach Those Little Things To Make Great Things Happen

3 Teachers Who Don’t Quit And Sure, Teach Those Little Things To Make Great Things Happen

Teaching is a noble profession and a time-consuming one as well. But there’s no greater cause than helping people realize their full potential and the little mistakes they make become less pronounced, greater and more rewarding. That’s something a lot of teachers go to great lengths to help others achieve.

There are so many things you can teach them and make them do their best on, whether it’s through musical instruments, sports or even leading their studies. Any time a little something is left undone, their attitude changes, and they start feeling more hopeful.

3 Teachers Who Don’t Quit And Sure, Teach Those Little Things To Make Great Things Happen

1. Beverly Elementary School in Staten Island, New York

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In a world that is ever-changing, with teachers that are constantly looking to improve, have you ever wondered what it was like to be a teacher right out of school? It’s a lot different than the way it is in 2018. Teachers often have to learn a new profession and relearn the routine; they have to forget and come to terms with doing another job. But for some who are on the Lower East Side in New York, that same routine is just changing from a hospital to a classroom.

Twenty-eight-year-old Isaac Santiago, a fourth-grade teacher at Beverly Elementary School, a school in Manhattan’s Lower East Side, has been in the teaching profession for eight years. When he was younger, he wanted to be a piano teacher. But after he graduated from high school and got his first job as a bartender, he eventually switched to teaching.

“A teacher’s job is to put students first and give them an opportunity to shine,” Santiago said. “I want to give each kid a chance to learn and reach their full potential.”

Sure, teachers have to be constantly out there keeping an eye on the grades and trying to keep up with all the requirements, but in the end, the kids’ success matters more.

“We say it’s an art, not a job, but we’re professionals and we do it for love. I’m here today, working with my colleagues for my students. That’s all there is to it.”

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