Study: Reading Novels in Math Class Increases Student Engagement

Study: Reading Novels in Math Class Increases Student Engagement

Study: Reading Novels in Math Class Increases Student Engagement

“Reading novels in math class can strengthen student engagement,” according to the American Literacy Study.

Higher reading levels correlated with overall academic achievement in that study.

Reading novels in math class increases students’ likelihood of becoming proficient readers.

In all STEM fields, such as engineering, physics, and computer science, student engagement and motivation are linked to student success.

However, reading novels in math class can boost student engagement and motivation.

That’s because reading novels is not only about reading the story, but also about creating a memory and experiencing stories that help them know and experience different worlds.

“Reading novels in math class can strengthen student engagement,” according to the American Literacy Study.

Moreover, according to an article in Reading Action , reading novels in math class “increases students’ likelihood of becoming proficient readers.”

Notably, students who read novels in math class are also more likely to report having a positive and engaging relationship with their teacher, which adds to student engagement and motivation.

This isn’t the first time that stories have been shown to boost student engagement and motivation.

In 1996, professors Jeffrey Wolff and Dana Lombardi from the University of Michigan research discovered that following a number of words in a story such as “I hate that” correlated with better school performance.

And, in 2015, a study published in Educational Testing Service’s journal, Prospect Report, discovered students who learned about a world where graphic novels such as the story of The Dark Knight Returns were used in textbooks were more interested in reading on their own.

In another study, published in Journal of Community Higher Education in 2014, Karen M. Jacobs, a Northwestern University professor, noted that experiencing a rom-com novel increased student’s self-efficacy and commitment to learning.

Last but not least, a 2016 article in Washington Post cited a Cornell University study where professors found that reading novels in math class made students more confident about their reasoning and investigation skills.

On a broader scale, reading novels in math class improves students’ performance in the United States’ recent Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study.

According to a 2018 Education Week, STEM Education Trends report, more than half of students with a school or college education improved their reading skills, compared to less than half of students in the U.S. school system as a whole.

So, there is no doubt that engaging literature helps students retain information and increase their interest in academic learning.

If you are struggling with your students in STEM courses, reading novels can help them gain a stronger understanding of how their research, experiments, and experiments can be used to solve real-world problems.

A recent example of a novel that engages students while studying hard is Book My Chemist: One Chemistry, One Story, from award-winning science writer Gregory Kerkness. It blends high-flying adventure with a serious look at the tricky science of chemistry.

Krakness uses the supernatural to provide an entertaining and engaging story about a fictional chemistry lab, the trials of chemists, and scientists.

According to the publishers, the result is a novel that is as engaging as it is fair.

This particular novel was honored with the Associated Press Science Education Choice Award for 2017 and recently won the 2018 Gene McCarthy Writer’s Award for literature in STEM.

Kara Newhouse is a senior editor at ADHD Content for the ADHD Experience. Kara has written for ABA Today and Inspired by Reading, among other sites. Kara previously contributed to Inside ADHD, Dailywell, and many other sites.

This article was originally published at ADHD Content. Reprinted with permission from the author.

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