Stereotype Threat Intervention helps change stereotypes and lead to career success

Stereotype Threat Intervention helps change stereotypes and lead to career success

Stereotype Threat Intervention helps change stereotypes and lead to career success

Stereotype Threat Intervention helps change stereotypes and lead to career success

A December 2016 study, “World of Science: Doing science to think for yourself” by Kathryn M. Stane, Nicholas M. Downes, Christopher T. Baum, and Martin Dresler, the authors argue that science teachers should encourage their students to discover the characteristics and interests that are unique to them that can make them unique. Stereotype Threat Intervention is a body of research that helps develop new strategies for teachers to effectively intervene and intervene with students in order to achieve this objective.

The study authors show that the presence of a stereotypical orientation to science might prevent children from realizing their unique role in the future of science. Curricula that address knowledge inequalities, including a bias towards the stereotypes of science and other subjects, contribute to the perpetuation of certain stereotypes that hamper a student’s ability to advance in the scientific field.

Stereotype Threat Intervention uses evidence-based strategies to counter an individual’s perceptions of the view that scientists either belong to a narrow array of demographic groups or share a common vision about how science is conducted. Preloaded information can be developed that stands in direct conflict with the student’s stereotypes. Academic journals that are more responsive to the needs of students and educators require researchers to include Stereotype Threat Intervention as an evidence-based intervention to cultivate a student’s curiosity for science.

Stereotype Threat Intervention was one of the many suggestions and tools researched for students to explore career goals in science in the final “World of Science: Doing science to think for yourself” by the authors of the Study published in Journal of Science and Society.

For more information,

s a downloadable PDF copy of the full “World of Science: Doing science to think for yourself”, or for a free trial subscription to the Magazine, go to http://www.subscription.ama…

This article was originally published on Intelligence on Demand (www.intelligenceondemand.com) a membership website for intelligence professionals.

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