Recipetips – 5 Science Videos on 1 April

Recipetips – 5 Science Videos on 1 April

Recipetips – 5 Science Videos on 1 April

A sports tournament not as routine as your team’s Final Four run is one you are looking forward to with anticipation. As you get ready for April, there is a game worthy of your time to reacquaint yourself with your hometown teams. Playing all sorts of sports can have a stimulating effect on your brain and you can gain a lot from it in terms of reward. Could this be the cure for the “winter blues”? In this case, I am thinking of a March Madness bracket from Chemistry and the Rock that you can use in your chemistry class.

You can learn more about Chemistry and the Rock in our previous post on the term – and the principles. The purpose of this video is to have a discussion about creating March Madness brackets from chemistry. The chemistry chapter emphasizes that all the theories involved in how you model fluids and explain how they move (moving in water, leaving a chemical reaction, etc.) can in fact be used for betting on sports.

For your own annual physical, check the current labs, either science labs at the university, or that one chemistry lab you passed last year. If you have more than one of these labs, make sure you remember everything and measure everything accurately. Try to do daily experiments in the lab this year that you missed last year, so you have taken a little extra time to remember.

We’ve added brackets to the video, so you can type your favorites or a team you use to make bets every year.

Like we didn’t say before, you can make other science-related and morale-boosting videos if you would like. We are currently creating a video about a new research methodology, and we are hoping that we can get good candidates for it.

Share your ideas and videos with us: When we see a video that is of good quality and useful, we are happy to include it in our next post. We would like to take all the best ideas and create another science video that helps you, your family, and even other teachers.

Ki Sung

Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry

University of Bristol

Hector Davies, Distinguished Professor in the Department of Chemistry

University of Bristol

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