New Book on Puzzles with Real Curriculum To Learn Physics, Biology, and Math!

New Book on Puzzles with Real Curriculum To Learn Physics, Biology, and Math!

New Book on Puzzles with Real Curriculum To Learn Physics, Biology, and Math!

MindShift is proud to announce a new two-part book series, The Silly Game: Learning Things That Won’t Make Sense When You Watch Them On A TV Set, as presented by MindShift Digital’s Gina Marra.

In MindShift’s, two new puzzles will teach students in grades 3 through 7 concepts learned in classroom units. These lessons are based on the science that shows “how even very strange ideas can be useful and interesting when used in conjunction with basic logical thinking,” says Marra.

The first puzzle uses simple tree shapes and mathematics to develop a fact pattern that’s easier to see on a large screen than on paper. Students learn how most concepts are revealed by putting them together in a logical progression that, in this case, began in left and is supported by right and bottom, to a branching pattern at the top. The pattern then goes further horizontally, and then some work out to the bottom, which, in this example, demonstrates the concept of “depth.”

You can watch a video of Marra demonstrating this puzzle here: https://www.youtube.com/wat…

The second puzzle is a more complex model designed to show students how solid objects support each other in one logical way, but become disjointed on a screen. And here, again, the students build a standard-looking pattern of rectangles and rectangles supporting one and doing the other (because balls support each other by the foot). But at the top of the image, you can see the difference between two separate pieces of the same pattern. That’s the root of the disjointed pattern. That’s how solid objects connect.

But this pattern develops slowly from the base, building upon itself to let you see all the different patterns that still have significance.

The students had one day to solve both puzzles, using a timing system which matched the thickness of the coding that Marra drew as part of her answer (green: One correct solution, yellow: Five correct solutions, orange: Five wrong answers). Here’s what the students were able to come up with:

Click here to download the entire learning kit.

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