5 Easy Steps For Parents To Teach Their Children the Internet Lesson

5 Easy Steps For Parents To Teach Their Children the Internet Lesson

5 Easy Steps For Parents To Teach Their Children the Internet Lesson

in her 2005 book, Teacher: How the Learning Process Works, Isabelle Parenti and Kenneth E. Baer published the most important lesson educators and parents could learn: “Teachers, parents, and children who strive to maximize learning (while limiting distractions), and parents who wait for the cues to curtail use, teach children to maintain constant alertness while they face challenges and learn tasks that are too complex for the mind to understand when set against the background of normal attention, forgetfulness, and other distractions. This lesson is the same for all learners of all ages: You don’t need to know everything all the time in order to find things useful, as long as your cognitive efforts focus on what is coming up next, and you remember what you know already. These skills are universal; they shape and inform the education we deliver to all children.”

This is the book we rely on in the classroom at MindShift. With parents and educators on the same page, we’re able to take the Learning Data from our online courses and tap into the algorithms to provide a more immediate engagement and effective instruction.

In addition to the book, Parenti and Baer offer the most important Internet Lesson for Parents. What they teach every parent is about the impact technology has had on children. They believe it’s a matter of constant vigilance to help our children manage the digital onslaught. So how do parents honor the benefits of digital devices while limiting kids’ use? We think the following five steps will help them:

1. Embrace technology: Talk to children about what you are learning about when you use technology with them. Asking children to do what you can do but asking them to do it right is more likely to turn out better! 2. Limit access to dangerous sites: The evil social media and anonymous internet sites are populated with videos of people getting hurt or killed and usually have no information of how to avoid being hurt or killed. Discuss site visitation with children and hold yourself accountable when you click and put something into the world. Safety Tips for Home Internet Use from Slate V: Read more parenting advice from Slate, including advice on ways to counteract internet addiction and how to cover up computer use. 3. Solicit input for solutions: Teach your children to communicate and accept that they might not know everything, especially about the little things that may lead to addiction. 4. Recognize that digital allowances help: Children need a limited and worthwhile digital allowance that works for them. They need to make decisions for themselves about which websites they can go on. If they answer the question, “Do you want to go on this site,” with, “No!” it is always a good idea to block them from that site until they come to an overall conclusion about what they want to do.

5. Reframe: Everyone is the master of the universe, and the only thing that matters is “what you do with what you’ve learned.” When we set limits on our children’s use of the internet, we learn a lesson that they do not need to know everything all the time. In order to take advantage of what the Internet has to offer, they do not need to know everything all the time. Instead, like our second big lesson on how parents need to balance education and technology, we must balance learning with the rewards and distractions that come along with our digital lives.

Here is an overview of Isabelle Parenti and Kenneth E. Baer’s Internet Lesson for Parents:

In their book, they write, “Teachers, parents, and children who strive to maximize learning (while limiting distractions), and parents who wait for the cues to curtail use, teach children to maintain constant alertness while they face challenges and learn tasks that are too complex for the mind to understand when set against the background of normal attention, forgetfulness, and other distractions. This lesson is the same for all learners of all ages: You don’t need to know everything all the time in order to find things useful, as long as your cognitive efforts focus on what is coming up next, and you remember what you know already. These skills are universal; they shape and inform the education we deliver to all children.”

Information at the University of Maryland Press: http://school.umd.edu/libra…

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