Nevada: a state of extremes

Nevada: a state of extremes

Nevada: a state of extremes

Education and Arts in Nevada

[First of Three Parts]

In Clark County, the country’s largest school district, public school students must score an average of 15 to 17 on English language arts, 9 on math, and 8 on science. The average Nevada resident earns $46,880 in 2015. In other words, the educational system in Clark County – the state’s largest school district– does not have a massive payoff at the end of its expected four years.

But, first and foremost, it creates a school-based infrastructure designed to meet every student’s individual needs. Students learn and grow in the classroom. Teachers have the time and resources to learn their craft and adapt to the sometimes minute changes in instructional strategies or instruction methods found across the state. State-of-the-art facilities and facilities in the school cafeterias and hallways give students reason to leave their home environment and explore.

Additionally, the district has one of the highest percentages of young adults with college and advanced degrees.

And when it comes to the arts, the numbers are astonishingly accurate.

According to the Clark County School District, the percentage of students making English and mathematics grades A+ or better is 94 percent. In addition, more than two-thirds of students meet or exceed expectations on standardized tests. This statistics do not include the dozens of other arts subjects, though.

In fact, the majority of academic achievement comes through the classroom, not from proficiencies learned on college campuses.

The arts are a crucial component of the school day. The literacy curriculum includes skills necessary for success on college or career paths. In addition, arts training for secondary students supports arts-based initiatives, offering opportunities for students to learn essential skills in the performing, creative, performing or visual arts. As a result, the schools should be accredited with the National Association for the Education of Young Children, the National League of Arts Educators or the American Association of School Administrators. In fact, 113 local schools currently hold a AA for recognition as a high performing school district. And this does not include the variety of other schools in the district including those with a B+, B+, C+, C or D accreditation.

In total, 1,944 Clark County schools are currently accredited, and these include hundreds of elementary schools, middle schools, and high schools.

Because, in actuality, we do not mean just the academic tracks, but the whole system of education, including the arts. This means art education is foundational to education.

In fact, the arts are a crucial component of the school day. The literacy curriculum includes skills necessary for success on college or career paths. In addition, arts training for secondary students supports arts-based initiatives, offering opportunities for students to learn essential skills in the performing, creative, performing or visual arts. As a result, the schools should be accredited with the National Association for the Education of Young Children, the National League of Arts Educators or the American Association of School Administrators. In fact, 113 local schools currently hold a AA for recognition as a high performing school district. And this does not include the variety of other schools in the district including those with a B+, B+, C+, C or D accreditation.

We can do better. That is the goal. Today, the Oakland Institute – a non-profit organization that promotes civic engagement – released a new report with Nevada, titled Beyond State Textbooks and School District Boundaries. The report examines California, New York, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington – major states that offer public education for all students.

We need to move from a student-centric approach to one that focuses on better engaging students and strengthening the foundations of human development.

For more information on the Oakland Institute’s Beyond State Textbooks report, visit: http://arthur.net/reports/d… .

Since the publication of this article, the Oakland Institute has learned that eight high schools in Clark County were recently awarded the Association for the Advancement of Creative and Performing Arts (AAPPA) Teaching Fund Charter School District Excellence Award, recognized as districts whose students excel in the arts. The Oakland Institute thanks the educators and administrators from the eight districts in the northwest valley for their hard work and innovation in the area of arts education. And, we encourage more educators and administrators across the country to take a look at the Oakland Institute’s Beyond State Textbooks Report to better understand the importance of arts education.

This information was written by the Oakland Institute’s communications manager, M.L. Bettison-Vargas.

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