How Diversity Works: In an Our-Kids-First Culture, Hiring Teaches Students the Best Teachers

How Diversity Works: In an Our-Kids-First Culture, Hiring Teaches Students the Best Teachers

How Diversity Works: In an Our-Kids-First Culture, Hiring Teaches Students the Best Teachers

New York, NY (RPRN) 7/11/2016–Research finds that teaching students different ethnic, cultural, and racial backgrounds improves performance in a range of subjects. According to a study of more than 16,000 African American, Latino, Asian, and White students in 39 states, educational leaders who considered these characteristics in their hiring decisions found students, on average, performed better than their peers in students who did not have the same factors.

“This is the first academic study we’ve seen that uses these types of characteristics in decision-making,” says professor Arthur Vester, author of “Research on the Organization and Performance of Students in Head Start Program Educators.” “You just look at your own children and are you sure they are the best type of person to train? In a lot of these cases, working to broaden the type of people you’re teaching will likely make a good influence on the kids you are teaching.”

Further, the study suggests diverse classrooms can be used to improve the quality of education in both preschools and K-12 schools.

“It’s very promising that diversity in classrooms can be leveraged for quality education,” says Vester. “By doing the research on which groups of people are most effective, you can be a smart teacher and still provide equal access to education.”

Vester is an associate professor of education at Queens College of the City University of New York, and has a Ph.D. in educational psychology from Queens College. He is an author on many education publications, including articles and books on the cognitive development of different groups of students in the classroom.

Additional findings from the study, which appears in the April 2016 issue of the journal Education, indicate that to develop the social and emotional competencies needed to be effective teachers and to boost student performance overall, teachers need to include diversity in their strategies.

To find out how schools can use diversity to improve education, visit www.mindshift.com.

About MindShift

To begin meeting the demands of Generation Z, the generation who immigrated and became U.S. citizens in 2010-11, MindShift will develop exciting educational programs for elementary, middle, and high school students. These include curriculum development, character-building, and teen mentoring. To learn more, visit www.mindshift.com.

Media Contact: Nancy McCuen, +1-212-486-4217, [email protected]

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