It’s Now Or Never: Seize

It’s Now Or Never: Seize

It’s Now Or Never: Seize

Stakeholders and decision makers from across the country have been closely watching the evolution of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) implemented this year in at least 45 states. They’ve seen the right direction laid out as our education system shifts to a STEM-based future and it gets the chance to hit the ground running with a modernized curriculum.

Educators also have eyes on the Common Core State Standards, looking at how they’ll affect student achievement and how they might affect the budget and workforce for certain fields.

It’s high time for education leaders to do more than wait until 2017 to take stock of the new curriculum. While the Common Core has been lauded for focusing on deep and thorough pedagogical ideas, groups have begun discussing exactly how curriculum would be shaped to accommodate the new standards.

For example, in May, the National Education Association and National Council of Teachers of Mathematics announced they had agreed on a framework for a new teacher-training program based on the new standards. The program will focus on building data science skills and engaging students in simulations, as well as on fact-based math concepts and team-based problem solving.

Many educators have voiced concerns that new standards won’t prepare students for careers that will focus on data-centric, data-driven professions. But the reality is that data-driven jobs will be the fastest-growing occupations by 2030, according to an analysis by Census Bureau economist Sandra Mellen. Despite this, an NEA research study found that, throughout the country, not enough teachers are being trained to handle the workforce demands.

As the Common Core approach incorporates more than just knowledge and concepts, more attention is needed to aid teachers with their implementation.

However, many experts have expressed concerns over the evolution of Common Core curriculum, in particular the change to many online exercises. As students prepare for assessments, some school districts may be creating dud assessments that are of poor quality because teachers aren’t adequately familiar with them. In fact, there’s been a noticeable increase in student report cards deemed “UNAU” — error-related; “I CAN’T HELP YOU”; or “GRADE (NON-SCORE) IS BEING TAUGHT.”

As many educators say they prefer hands-on learning, such exams may not accurately show students whether or not they’re understanding concepts or activities. Additionally, they may not show proper assessment of critical thinking and comprehension skills needed for students to think critically and take great care with their work.

One answer to teach career-ready, technology-based learning may be the New York State Teaching Fellows Program, which does exactly that. Teachers who participate in the program can enroll in an advanced course that meets five to seven times a year. The program, created by the New York State Education Department, is designed for educators who aspire to apply their knowledge to teach in some of the growing career fields such as health sciences, healthcare administration, digital technology, and life science.

Technology is taking on many roles in today’s workforce. In addition to requiring students to be able to obtain and utilize vital resources such as mobile phones, social media, and Internet access, digital jobs demand these types of skills from individuals in many fields.

The Common Core doesn’t need to exist next year. It needs to exist now.

Stakeholders and decision makers from across the country have been closely watching the evolution of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) implemented this year in at least 45 states. They’ve seen the right direction laid out as our education system shifts to a STEM-based future and it gets the chance to hit the ground running with a modernized curriculum.

Educators also have eyes on the Common Core State Standards, looking at how they’ll affect student achievement and how they might affect the budget and workforce for certain fields.

It’s high time for education leaders to do more than wait until 2017 to take stock of the new curriculum. While the Common Core has been lauded for focusing on deep and thorough pedagogical ideas, groups have begun discussing exactly how curriculum would be shaped to accommodate the new standards.

For example, in May, the National Education Association and National Council of Teachers of Mathematics announced they had agreed on a framework for a new teacher-training program based on the new standards. The program will focus on building data science skills and engaging students in simulations, as well as on fact-based math concepts and team-based problem solving.

Many educators have voiced concerns that new standards won’t prepare students for careers that will focus on data-centric, data-driven professions. But the reality is that data-driven jobs will be the fastest-growing occupations by 2030, according to an analysis by Census Bureau economist Sandra Mellen.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *