Teachers, Watch Out: Building High-Quality Learning Communities

Teachers, Watch Out: Building High-Quality Learning Communities

Teachers, Watch Out: Building High-Quality Learning Communities

When working with schools and staff members to put learning communities together in schools, developing and supporting a methodology that is truly engaging, collaborative, and engaging for students and staff is essential. If a team is not made up of teachers, students, and parents, then what exactly are we going to create that will bring the group together, build trust, and foster an environment of commitment?

Building schools with learning communities

Project-based learning has different components than classroom-based learning. There are three main components of these educational techniques:

The learning community. Students connect with teachers; they also learn and interact with each other. Within this learning community, there are different teams developing different projects. To encourage students to create the projects they want to create, teachers work together to create the framework that will support the group creating these projects.

Students connect with teachers; they also learn and interact with each other. Within this learning community, there are different teams developing different projects. To encourage students to create the projects they want to create, teachers work together to create the framework that will support the group creating these projects. Keeping the open-ended nature of a learning community. Project-based learning teams need time to take a course on the project they are working on. With fewer constraints, they may actually get more projects done in a short period of time.

Project-based learning teams need time to take a course on the project they are working on. With fewer constraints, they may actually get more projects done in a short period of time. Helping students figure out how to turn their project into a teaching tool. In working with a project-based learning team, students learn that their “methods” may be different than their peers or teachers, and need to find the “moderators” for their own project.

Project-based learning has different components than classroom-based learning.

It should be noted that more than just project-based learning techniques, the goal of a learning community is to promote and reinforce positive school climate. A healthy school climate includes a safe, welcoming, and progressive environment for students, staff, and teachers to share knowledge and get support from each other.

As you view the learning community process, the goals will come to light. You will be able to track which goals have been achieved. If all students feel they are included in the learning process, attendance may go up, and learning will increase. What kind of environment will these children be building as they leave?

How is this helpful for educators?

While some people look at the whole learning community process as a program with different components that are in place to build a successful learning community, many educators look at the initiative as one that needs to be a driving force in school culture. How will the team of teachers and students develop into relationships that both work together and have support? How will the environment that the team is creating promote a culture of belonging? All of these things help to highlight the community that will make a school a successful learning community.

A thorough practice for a learning community

Now is the time for educators to start to consider the characteristics of a learning community. Establishing a curriculum for each team is one way to start the process. However, the experience itself is what most of the learning communities will have built into their organizational framework. This can be a positive or negative process depending on the personal objectives. There is no wrong or right way to make a learning community; it is just a different way of approaching your work.

However, if you choose to use the learning community concept in your classroom and you can teach it well, you are building a model of learning from the start. You will be able to contribute to the development of a learning community from the start that will allow your community to flourish and support it.

Katrina Schwartz is a licensed psychologist and the founder of Long Island Child, Inc. She has worked with more than 1,100 children in all grades at several different Long Island high schools. For more information about how you can help your child grow into a positive, productive adult, visit www.longislandchild.com or call 631-571-0081.

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