Aldergrove, British Columbia: 84 Survivors of first grade

Aldergrove, British Columbia: 84 Survivors of first grade

Aldergrove, British Columbia: 84 Survivors of first grade

A legend that’s been passed down through the generations of Aldergrove, British Columbia, hundreds of years ago to our very own student, who now as a grown adult walks with a walker, is why the birds might call you “Teddy.”

According to old timers, our local birds knew better.

You see, according to the birds of Aldergrove, the teacher’s pet bird in the photographs is certain that his classmate was “Can-He”; so it’s practically a certainty that the bird of Aldergrove knows what that means: “can-he friend”

Aldergrove, British Columbia, Canada ~ North America (via smartplanet.com sister site, Oh Gizmo!) -A legend that’s been passed down through the generations of Aldergrove, British Columbia, hundreds of years ago to our very own student, who now as a grown adult walks with a walker, is why the birds might call you “Teddy.”

“As of what appeared to be 1931 or 1930, my grandfather had a snake and a tortoise in his backyard,” Aldergrove school teacher Gavin Finlayson, an original survivor from the first grade (1928), told the Royal British Columbia Museum. “My grandfather would often put these two things outside of the classroom because he saw them much more than other pupils in the foyer of school.”

Why so well-known?

In the past, the snakes and tortoises were domestic pets, according to the Museum. Most are still alive and well, but “in time they’ve come to the attention of the Aldergrove Secondary School community, which will host a celebration to recognize and honor the Senior Oldest of the School’s old-timers on Tuesday, February 24, 2015 from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. at the Evergreen Secondary School.”

As a recent survivor from ‘Aldergrove’s first grade,’ Gavin Finlayson is one of the main reasons his fellow former students and staff have the respect of all the school’s other 88 students and staff, as well as the communities of Aldergrove and Vancouver.

Finlayson, on the condition that he not be named, and little brother Patrick Finlayson, a 30-year-old jazz musician, told the Canadian Press that they’re thrilled with the museum’s effort, adding that having been at the school for five years, they’ve learned “to be proud of our roots and very grateful to our own school.”

According to another survivor, “To have something like this happen here is a big deal,” Larry McKenzie, who was an orphan when he arrived at the school at age eight. “You would like to think that teachers were good, but sometimes this seems to happen all the time.”

Amazingly, the museum is calling for volunteers to help with the celebration, help take part in a centennial observance and additional information on Saturday, March 21, from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. at the museum’s open house.

For more information, please contact 315-883-4544 or [email protected]

You may also find more about Aldergrove from the Royal British Columbia Museum by visiting their website: http://rcm.bc.ca/english/si…

Over the years, as one of only two surviving former first-graders from the Aldergrove school, Finlayson has been involved in activities with the Abbotsford Artists in the Classroom, an alumni group that is dedicated to bringing stories and images of the past to life and bringing great teaching opportunities to today’s students. One example was the painting of a mural in an inner-city school, where he worked as a staff artist.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *