PBL Research Attracts Young Students to STEM Education (HIGHLIGHTS)

PBL Research Attracts Young Students to STEM Education (HIGHLIGHTS)

PBL Research Attracts Young Students to STEM Education (HIGHLIGHTS)

GAPS in STEM education has remained a major topic of debate in recent years, but a project conducted by the CAPE has focused on one of the key ways in which this gap might be reduced: Project-Based Learning (PBL). According to the latest report of the National Academy of Sciences Research Performance Board (NAPSRP), PBL strategies include engaging students with hands-on projects, putting students in a supervised environment with teachers, and student-supervised learning, with the students conducting the research.

This summer, we at NAMOIS(R) explored the performance gains of a PBL project when introducing classroom initiatives to students, including the implications of this for the future of STEM education. The report, entitled My Physics Classroom Project-Based Learning: Lessons Learned from an Undergraduate Pilotship, introduces two recent experiments to examine PBL’s overall performance in innovative classroom learning: the Misalucha Institut Malmö (MITM) Pilatus PBL, and the Hands/Innovation Collaborative (HIC). Both Pilatus PBL and HIC students worked at home with their parents to investigate physics phenomena, and the NAMS report presented student findings, reflections, and key learning outcomes. This resulted in student discussions of how these experiments would look if presented in class, as well as lessons learned from faculty, peers, and parents.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *